Back to school devotional thought 2011

Google is celebrating what would have been the 410th birthday of mathematician Pierre de Fermat with a homepage doodle that transforms the company’s logo into a complex math problem known as Fermat’s marginalia.

De Fermat’s greatest legacy is that he wrote down this unfinished problem for generations of students and scholars to try and solve.  This math problem was written in the margins of a text book which was written in Latin and later discovered by his son after he died. 

The problem stated that it is impossible to separate a cube into two cubes, or a fourth power into two fourth powers, or in general, any power higher than the second, into two like powers. I have discovered a truly marvelous proof of this, which this margin is too narrow to contain.”  In other words, an + bn can never equal cn , as long as ab, and c are positive integers and as long as n is greater than two.  Even though he lived for another 28 years, Fermat never got around to sharing his “truly marvelous proof” with anyone, as far as we know.  In fact, one journal call Fermat the saint of unfinished business.  

In many ways, one of the most beautiful things about our lives is that we too are unfinished and we are growing into the young people that God wants us to be.  As many of you start school this week, it will be exciting to catch up with your friends, get to know your new teachers, and realize how much we remember from last year and how much more there is to learn about the world God created!  But I hope that you will be encouraged to know that Jesus loves you and He will be with you as start the new year.  Jesus will walk with you and help you to grow. 

As you start this new school year, the pastors want you to know that we are praying for each one of you and remember this promise found in the Bible. 

 And I am certain that God, who began the good work within you, will continue his work until it is finally finished on the day when Christ Jesus returns. Philippians 1:6

google.com / christian science monitor

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